The Sandbox Blog

This is where I share studio notes and thoughts from behind the scenes here at Creative Sandbox Solutions™ HQ. I’m all about process here, and I’m transparent about mine, so you can learn from both my wins and my mistakes.

If you have any questions or comments, don’t be shy — drop me a line! I’d love to hear from you.

How invisible balls help turn uncertainty and self-doubt into fuel

“Zoom!” I yelled as I threw an invisible ball to Jay. “Zoom!” he echoed, catching it, then “swish!” as he tossed it to Ann.

Ann repeated Jay’s “swish!” then passed the ball to Tom with a “Pop!”

And the invisible ball continued around the circle.

It may sound like a group of kids playing at recess, but this was actually a Board of Directors at a strategic workshop I led recently.

Activities like this one, borrowed from the world of improv, help teams and individuals increase and read more…

My Sketchnotes from AIN 2019

My Sketchnotes from AIN 2019

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to attend two conferences “back East”—the International Forum of Visual Practitioners, in Montclair, NJ, and the Applied Improvisation Network, in Stony Brook, NY (with a Learning Journey in Manhattan).

As a visual practitioner, of course I took visual notes, also known as sketchnotes (a term invented by Mike Rohde, author of The Sketchnote Handbook (aff), so I thought it would be fun to share some of them here on the blog!

Sketchnotes are personal notes designed for the note-taker’s private use. They are not intended to be displayed—they’re notes… with visuals.

Why sketchnote?

Research shows that read more…

Beware the Performance Reset

Beware the performance reset—it’s a double-edged sword!

Yes, they help low performers, but it turns out they HURT high ones.

A new study finds that for people who were already doing well, resets are demotivating and actually cause #performance to decline!

The study analyzed archival data from Major League Baseball, and found that when traded across leagues, players with high batting averages saw a 13-point decline!

What’s going on here?

The researcher say resets affect self-efficacy, or confidence about future performance.

“Given a chance to put past performance failures behind them, employees may…recover more easily,” she writes.

“However, managers should be aware that performance resets affect employees differently…. [They] may consider communicating positive expectations to and instilling confidence in top performers when a reset occurs.”

From HBR Sept/Oct 2019

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Your turn: have you ever wanted a chance to hit the reset button?

Ready to Unleash Creativity In Your Organization?